Injuries In Cats and Their Holistic Support

The holistic support for injuries in cats has the potential to heal faster, more completely, without complications, with much less stress and much more economically. This applies to minor or serious injuries to cats.

 

injuries in cats

It is common in our time for people to panic and rush to the vet (or GP) with a minor injury. The media has become very clever at putting the fear of god into most people; that without medical intervention your cat (or you) may die or transmit some terrifying disease.

The fact is, veterinary treatment is completely unnecessary in most minor cases and many major injuries. Much of it is harmful. Everyone, cats included, evolved with a strong immune system, that managed very well to heal injuries, given the right circumstances.

The important aspects to consider include:

  • having a healthy immune system
  • allowing the cat freedom to do what comes naturally
  • making sure they are able to rest peacefully
  • being aware of the subtle signs of improvement
  • when, and where, to seek professional advice

Having a Healthy Immune System

This is the most vital part for anyone’s ability to deal with injuries. Or epidemics. Or anything. A cat with a healthy immune system will be able to shrug off diseases and effectively deal with any and every injury, however serious. The more serious injuries may need extra support, but it’s the level of the cats natural health that is most instrumental in their successful recovery.

The best way to ensure your cat’s immune system is in the best shape possible is to feed them a quality, natural diet, similar to the one their ancestors evolved on. And treating all their ailments with an holistic/energetic health care system, such as homeopathy.

This is critical in the recovery potential for any injuries in cats, or any injuries in anyone.

Allowing The Cat Freedom To Do What Comes Naturally

A cat limping after a fall, a cat claw injury, a cat tail wound, a cat fight injury, any cat injury even if you are concerned about infection, is best given your intelligent assessment before deciding on the best course of action. The fact is that we are all able to heal ourselves, given the right opportunity.

injuries in catsIf the skin is broken and is within easy reach of the cats mouth, licking is a wonderful healing practice. Licking a wound cleans it and washes away debris. A cat should ALWAYS be allowed to lick any wound. Licking a wound will prevent most infections in a healthy cat. This is FAR superior to washing it. And to any antibiotic which has down sides.

Licking in cats can be washing, bonding, cleaning or tasting. And probably a lot more. So versatile. So tactile.

Rest Is An Essential Part Of Healing

Any injury is, to a lesser or greater extent, a shock. All shock is best treated with rest and sleep. Cats are really good at knowing the importance of this, but they can only do this if they are left alone in familiar surroundings, in peace, at a clement temperature (most cats love warmth). As you can imagine, being at a busy veterinary practise with noise and other stressed animals, with strange people invading their space and being caged in stainless, is the antithesis of this. Then the shock is added to and may never heal.

Being Aware Of The Subtle Signs Of Improvement

Minor injuries in cats such as a small cut or wound, an injury from jumping or a fall or anything other than a serious injury, probably won’t affect any other important part of the system, such as appetite or energy. So to measure improvement, you would want to see that the cut or wound is clean, with healthy pink tissue, and closing in the coming days. Appetite and energy should be maintained.

The only improvement you are looking for in a cat limping after a fall is the gradual lessening of the limp. This can take a few days, or even longer, when a soft tissue such as a ligament or tendon was bruised.

If there is obvious pain on gentle examination of the affected area, a fracture may be the cause.

Pain killers are not a good idea as they will mask the severity of the injury and the cat may further injure themselves. Worse still is confining a cat so they can’t do anything. We would find that boring and frustrating at the very least. Mental and emotional contentment is essential to healing. The opposite can hinder the healing.

When and Where to Seek Professional Support

When the injury is serious, obviously it’s a good idea to seek professional help. But is a vet the only person to consider?

A conventional vet may not want to even look at your cat unless you vaccinate them then and there. Even though vaccinating an ailing cat is NOT recommended by any thinking person, and is even stated on the vaccine insert.

Are antibiotics, anti-inflammatories, pain killers the best way to support healing?

They are suppressive by nature. Which means they also hinder the natural healing of the body. Antibiotics will do further harm by destroying the important gut bacteria that make up 90% of the immune system.

What else can you do?

Homeopathy for cats is excellent at treating any and every disorder. It is gentle, supports the immune system, has no unwanted or adverse reactions. Healing can be fast, without incident and often without further stress.

Obviously in many cases the use of a professional homeopath may be necessary. But if you have learned to use some of the more common remedies through a home prescribing course, you may be able to treat your cat yourself. At home. Avoiding further stress.

Assessing the seriousness of the injury, in a calm state of mind, is the first thing to do. If in doubt, and you have a relationship with a homeopath you trust, then asking their advice would be a good idea.

Learn how to heal injuries in cats and you automatically can apply that to you and other family members.

First and foremost, make sure your cat has a healthy immune system so any injury has the best potential to heal quickly and easily. The diet is KING!
Second, trust your cats ability to heal naturally.
Third, find a homeopath you trust so you know where to go, who to ask, in times of crisis or uncertainty.